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More about Proctors

More Dangers of Practicing with Good Proctors

Practice and diagnostic testing is an important part of preparation for the LSAT, bar exam, and other standardized tests.  Being able to perform during test-day conditions is, of course, crucial, and experiencing multiple rounds of “dress rehearsal” helps to improve such performance.

Test preparation companies, meanwhile, naturally want to impress their students by hiring proctors for practice tests who are dependably punctual, friendly, and otherwise professional.

Unfortunately, this habit may be good for a test preparation company’s image, but it’s not good for students.

Test-Day Troubles

The reality is that, on the day of the actual test, the proctor you get may not be at all like the proctor with whom you practiced.  LEX students routinely report proctor-related disruptions on the day of the actual LSAT or bar exam.  Some such problems include:

– hostile proctor who had a verbal argument during or immediately before the time the LSAT or bar exam clock was running
– late proctor who kept students waiting for the start of or return to the test
– proctor who smelled like smoke
– disorganized proctor who bumbled logistics of the test
– forgetful proctor who did not provide one (or more) of the time warnings upon which students tend to rely

At LEX, we half-jokingly tell students that test preparation companies should instruct their proctors to do everything wrong—or should simply hire people who are not able to handle the basic tasks of proctors, thereby ensuring that one or more of the above problems will arise.  Such a practicing environment would prepare students more fully than does an atmosphere in which everything runs smoothly.

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LSAT Intensity

While the SAT, GRE, MPRE, bar exam and numerous other standardized tests are difficult in their own ways, the LSAT offers some challenges that set it apart from most standardized tests.

One such distinction is that the LSAT does not test your memory, at least not in an overt way.  For instance, the bar exam requires that you memorize many rules of law and then competently reproduce these rules of law when writing your bar exam essays.  The LSAT requires no such recall.

It should be noted, however, that the LSAT does require a great deal of memory in the form of a highly developed command of the English language and vocabulary.  But this reality is true of any exam that has a reading comprehension component.

Instead of testing memory, the LSAT tests one’s ability to reason through problems on the spot in real time.  In other words, the test selects for people who are good at what we might call colloquially “thinking on their feet.”

Given this emphasis on real-time thinking, the LSAT calls for test-takers to prepare in the way that a performing artist or an athlete prepares.  Cultivating the ability to maintain a high level of concentration or intensity of thought for the duration of the test is, in short, a key aspect of effective LSAT prep.

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LSAT Prep | Reading Comprehension | Overview

History

The reading comprehension section of the LSAT acquired its basic present form in 1991 but underwent a minor change in 2007. This minor change consisted of replacement of a single traditional passage with two smaller passages to be compared.

Importance

The reading comprehension section typically contributes twenty-seven (27) or twenty-eight (28) of the approximately 100 questions that go into a test-taker’s final LSAT score. This section, therefore, accounts for approximately 28% of the test-taker’s score, making it the second most important section on the LSAT (logical reasoning is first at about 50%, and analytical reasoning (often called “logic games“) is last at about 22%).

Content

Each LSAT comprises one scored reading comprehension section. The reading comprehension section consists of four subsections. Three of these subsections include a single long passage followed by five to eight questions. One of these subsections includes two shorter passages followed by seven or eight questions; the two shorter passages are related to each other in some way so as to serve as grounds for questions that call for comparison of the two passages.Each question is followed by five possible responses, lettered A through E. Only one response of the five possible responses is a credited response, i.e., the “right answer.”

Timing

The reading comprehension section is allotted 35 minutes.

Technical Information

Unlike the GRE or GMAT, the LSAT is a paper-based test. A test taker’s answers must be recorded (“bubbled in”) on an answer sheet using a soft lead pencil, which answer sheet is then scanned and electronically graded. No credit (or penalty) is given for marks in the test booklet. There is no penalty for guessing.

Strategy and Tactics

Many LSAT preparation companies are available today to assist students in preparing for the LSAT and the logical reasoning section thereof. LSAT prep companies typically provide in-class instruction regarding logical principles, test-taking strategy, and diagramming techniques. These LSAT prep courses may also include proctored mock LSATs. LSAT prep providers may also offer online LSAT training, computerized analysis of a student’s LSAT performance, and one-on-one LSAT tutoring.

For More Information

Students preparing for the LSAT reading comprehension section are advised to get a free copy of “Eight Questions for Your LSAT Tutor—and One for You” from LSAT Tutor.net.

 

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LSAT | Analytical Reasoning (“Logic Games”) | Overview

History

The analytical reasoning (“logic games”) section of the LSAT has been in its basic present form since 1991.

Importance

The analytical reasoning section generally contributes approximately twenty-two (22) out of the approximately one hundred (100) questions that go into computation of an LSAT-taker’s final score.As such, this section accounts for approximately 22% of the test-taker’s score, which makes it the least important section on the LSAT (reading comprehension is second at about 28%, and logical reasoning is the most important section at about 50%) in terms of impact on one’s score.

Content

Each LSAT comprises one scored analytical reasoning section. The analytical reasoning section consists of four subsections. Each of these subsections provides a “logic game” that comprises a set of rules about at least one set of variables. Each logic game is then followed by five to eight questions regarding these variables.Each question is in turn followed by five answer choices, only one of which choices is the “credited response,” i.e., the right answer.

Timing

LSAT-takers are given 35 minutes to take the analytical reasoning section.

Technical Information

The LSAT is a paper-based test, unlike many other standardized tests that are taken on a computer (e.g., GRE, GMAT). LSAT-takers’ answers are recorded (“bubbled in”) on an answer sheet using a soft lead pencil, which answer sheet is then scanned and electronically graded. No credit (or penalty) is given for marks in the test booklet. There is no penalty for guessing.

Strategy and Tactics

Many LSAT preparation companies are available today to assist students in preparing for the LSAT and the analytical reasoning section thereof. These LSAT prep companies typically provide in-class instruction regarding logical principles, test-taking strategy, and diagramming techniques. These LSAT courses may also include proctored mock LSATs. LSAT prep providers may also offer online LSAT testing, automated analysis of a student’s LSAT performance, and one-on-one LSAT tutoring.

For More Information

Students preparing for the LSAT reading comprehension section are advised to get a free copy of “Eight Questions for Your LSAT Tutor—and One for You” from LSAT Tutor.net.

 

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Logical Reasoning Overview

History

The logical reasoning section of the LSAT took its present form in 1991.

Importance

The logical reasoning section typically comprises about 50 questions out of the approximately 100 questions that go into a test-taker’s LSAT score. This section is therefore the most important section on the LSAT, serving as the basis for essentially 50 percent of one’s final LSAT score. Reading comprehension (about 28% of one’s LSAT score) and analytical reasoning (often called “logic games,” at about 22% of one’s LSAT score) are second and third in importance, respectively.

Content

Each modern (i.e., post-1991) LSAT comprises two scored logical reasoning sections. Each logical reasoning section contains approximately twenty-five (25) short passages, most commonly one paragraph in length each. Each passage is then followed by a question to be answered or a statement to be finished.The question or statement is then followed by five possible responses, lettered A through E. Only one response of the five possible responses is the “credited response,” i.e., the right answer.

Timing

Each logical reasoning section is allotted 35 minutes.

Technical Information

Unlike the GRE or GMAT, the LSAT is a paper-based test. A test taker’s answers must be recorded (“bubbled in”) on an answer sheet using a soft lead pencil, which answer sheet is then scanned and electronically graded. No credit (or penalty) is given for marks in the test booklet. There is no penalty for guessing.

Strategy and Tactics

Many LSAT preparation companies are available today to assist students in preparing for the LSAT and the logical reasoning section thereof. LSAT prep companies typically provide in-class instruction regarding logical principles, test-taking strategy, and diagramming techniques. These LSAT prep courses may also include proctored mock LSATs. LSAT prep providers may also offer online LSAT training, computerized analysis of a student’s LSAT performance, and one-on-one LSAT tutoring.

For More Information

Students preparing for the LSAT reading comprehension section are advised to get a free copy of “Eight Questions for Your LSAT Tutor—and One for You” from LSAT Tutor.net.

 

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